DEPARTURE FROM THE AIRPORT

Seen at Kiev Landscape Park. Since these tulips are not for sale, only display, they are planted so that not all bloom at the same time. So it could have been better!

Seen at Kiev Landscape Park. Since these tulips are not for sale, only display, they are planted so that not all bloom at the same time. So it could have been better!

Hello.  Good morning.  I did not write a post yesterday as it was a public holiday.  So you are now leaving the country where you have been holiday.  What do you need to know?  Here we go.  I do not think it is as stressful as when you arrive but you still need some vocabulary.  Here is a conversation from :

Airport English

Airport English

check inAirports are stressful even in your own native country. Practise these English phrases before you travel to English speaking destinations.

Tip: Print these and keep them as a “cheat sheet” in your carry-on luggage.

Questions you will hear at the check-in counter:
Ticket please.
May I see your ticket?
Do you have an e-ticket?
Do you have some photo ID?
How many bags are you checking?
Did you pack these bags yourself?
Do you have a carry-on bag? (a bag or purse to take on the airplane)
Do you require special assistance? (example a “wheelchair”)
Have you paid your airport improvement fee/tax?
Would you like a window or an aisle seat? (aisle is pronounced “eye + l”)

Problems you may hear:
Your baggage is overweight. (Remove some contents or pay a fine.)
Your carry-on luggage is too large.
Your flight is delayed. (It’s late.)
Your flight has been cancelled. (You must rebook a new flight)
Your connecting flight/connection has been cancelled/is delayed.
Your ticket is expired.
Your passport is expired.

airport screenCommands and questions at the Security Checkpoint:
Boarding pass, please.
ID please. (show your photo ID)
Spread your arms out please. (Put your arms up and out to the sides of your body)
Take your shoes off.
Open your bag.
Take off/remove your belt.
Do you have any change in your pockets?
Do you have any metals?
Do you have any food/produce?
Do you have any liquids or medicine?
Walk through.
You must dump all food or beverages. (You can’t bring it through the gates.)

Questions YOU may need to ask:
Is my flight on time?
When should I be at the gate?
Where is the boarding gate?
Where is the washroom?
Can I get a window seat?
Is there somewhere to eat?
Can I get a coffee at the gate?
Is my connection on time?
Where do I collect my baggage?
Where can I find a taxi?
Where is the departure gate?
Where is the arrival gate?
Where is the check-in desk for ….airlines?
Where is the domestics level?
Where is the international level?

More Airline Vocabulary
Practise Checking-in

Wordchecker:
cheat sheet: a small piece of paper with answers or hints that you have with you
departures: flights that are leaving this airport
arrivals: flights that are landing at this airport
e-ticket: a ticket you purchased online and printed from your computer
aisle seat: a seat next to the long walking path on the plane
boarding pass: the ticket you give at the gates (has your seat number)
belt: clothing item that holds up pants (sets off metal detector)
metals: items such as jewellery, coins, belt buckles, knives, keys
liquids: beverages
expired: no longer useful (the date has passed)
check-in: show your ticket and ID and hand in your baggage
connection: the point where your plane lands and you must catch another plane
domestic: in the same country as the airport
international: in a different country than the airport

Hope that this is useful to you especially if you are going on holiday to an English speaking country.  This could be quite imminent since Summer is around the corner.  Happy Tuesday!!

ARRIVING AT AN ENGLISH SPEAKING COUNTRY

Spring day in Albacete (Spain)

 

Today I am going to talk about  arrivals  at the airport.  I have gathered as much information as I can to help you. Arriving at an airport can be quite daunting for both English -speaking and even more so for non-English speaking travellers.  I remember arriving at Heathrow for the first time.  I was so scared.  And I could speak English!!!  So why was I so scared.  I just had to follow the instructions.  But there were so many signs and so many people.  I kept looking up and down, from side to side.  Hope you do not have to do all that I had to do.  Maybe you can understand the signs already.

 

Airport English

https://edition.englishclub.com/survival/airport-english/

Airport English

check inAirports are stressful even in your own native country. Practise these English phrases before you travel to English speaking destinations.

Tip: Print these and keep them as a “cheat sheet” in your carry-on luggage.

Questions you will hear at the check-in counter:
Ticket please.
May I see your ticket?
Do you have an e-ticket?
Do you have some photo ID?
How many bags are you checking?
Did you pack these bags yourself?
Do you have a carry-on bag? (a bag or purse to take on the airplane)
Do you require special assistance? (example a “wheelchair”)
Have you paid your airport improvement fee/tax?
Would you like a window or an aisle seat? (aisle is pronounced “eye + l”)

Problems you may hear:
Your baggage is overweight. (Remove some contents or pay a fine.)
Your carry-on luggage is too large.
Your flight is delayed. (It’s late.)
Your flight has been cancelled. (You must rebook a new flight)
Your connecting flight/connection has been cancelled/is delayed.
Your ticket is expired.
Your passport is expired.

airport screenCommands and questions at the Security Checkpoint:
Boarding pass, please.
ID please. (show your photo ID)
Spread your arms out please. (Put your arms up and out to the sides of your body)
Take your shoes off.
Open your bag.
Take off/remove your belt.
Do you have any change in your pockets?
Do you have any metals?
Do you have any food/produce?
Do you have any liquids or medicine?
Walk through.
You must dump all food or beverages. (You can’t bring it through the gates.)

Questions YOU may need to ask:
Is my flight on time?
When should I be at the gate?
Where is the boarding gate?
Where is the washroom?
Can I get a window seat?
Is there somewhere to eat?
Can I get a coffee at the gate?
Is my connection on time?
Where do I collect my baggage?
Where can I find a taxi?
Where is the departure gate?
Where is the arrival gate?
Where is the check-in desk for ….airlines?
Where is the domestics level?
Where is the international level?

More Airline Vocabulary
Practise Checking-in

Wordchecker:
cheat sheet: a small piece of paper with answers or hints that you have with you
departures: flights that are leaving this airport
arrivals: flights that are landing at this airport
e-ticket: a ticket you purchased online and printed from your computer
aisle seat: a seat next to the long walking path on the plane
boarding pass: the ticket you give at the gates (has your seat number)
belt: clothing item that holds up pants (sets off metal detector)
metals: items such as jewellery, coins, belt buckles, knives, keys
liquids: beverages
expired: no longer useful (the date has passed)
check-in: show your ticket and ID and hand in your baggage
connection: the point where your plane lands and you must catch another plane
domestic: in the same country as the airport
international: in a different country than the airport

 

You will probably arrive at one of London’s five commercial airports. Transport links from all of the airports into the centre of London are good, although some are further away than others. There is information below on how to get from the airport to your accommodation and you can choose for us to organise your transfer or to make your own way.

Heathrow Airport

By Underground

London Underground’s Piccadilly line provides you with a quick, cost-effective route to the airport from the capital. There are three Underground stations (Heathrow Terminals 2 and 3 and one each at Terminal 4 and 5; in fare zone 6) serving the central terminal area. Journey time is under an hour and you shouldn’t have to wait longer than ten minutes for a train – even off-peak. Purchase a Travelcard and you’re covered for buses and some trains too. Underground walkways link the Heathrow tube station with the terminals. Tickets are available at London Underground stations; from ticket offices or machines. For travelling to many of our host families, it is practical to take the underground to Acton Town and then to take a taxi (there is a taxi office in Acton Town underground station).

Trains to central London

Station First train Last train
Terminals 2 & 3 05:12 (Sun 05:56) 23:45 (Sun 23:28
Terminal 4 05:02 (Sun 05:46) 23:35 (Sun 23:15*)
Terminal 5 05:23 (Sun 06:07) 23:42 (Sun 23:25)

*change at Heathrow Terminals 2 & 3

Trains from central London (Piccadilly Circus)

Station First train Last train
Terminals 2 & 3 05:47 (Sun 07:05) 00:32 (Sun 23:38)
Terminal 4 05:42 (Sun 07:05*) 23:09 (22:40)
Terminal 5 05:47 (Sun 07:05) 00:22 (Sun 23:24)

*change at Hatton Cross

These times are subject to change – it is advisable to check with London Underground travel information before travelling.

By Train

The Heathrow Express is a non-stop train service that offers the fastest travel option between Heathrow Airport and Paddington. Paddington is not particularly conveniently located for the school or for most of the accommodation we use but it is convenient for Central London. Services run every 15 minutes and the journey time is just 15 minutes; 7/8 minutes more to and from Terminal 4. A Express Saver fare is £22.0 and a Express Saver return is £36. For details of special offers and to pre-book tickets visit the Heathrow Express Website or ring 0845 600 1515 (UK only).

By Taxi

Each Heathrow terminal has clearly signposted taxi ranks. Expect a fare of around £30-35 to West London.  The journey time is about 30 minutes. Only take a licensed or London (black) cab.

Heathrow Airport Website

Heathrow Airport Guide

Gatwick Airport

By Train

The fastest train service into Central London is the Gatwick Express which travels direct to London Victoria station and operates seven days a week. Trains are non-stop and run every 15 minutes from 05:00 to 23:45 and at 03.30, 04.30, 00:02 and 00:32, with a journey time of 30 minutes on Monday – Saturday and 35 minutes on Sundays. Click here for ticket fares. Southern and Thameslink also run a service from Gatwick, with a slightly longer journey time of 35 minutes. There are four/five trains per hour, Monday to Friday, with an hourly service overnight.

For information on these services call the National Rail Enquiry service on 08457 48 49 50 or see the Gatwick Express Website.

By Taxi

Gatwick is further from London than Heathrow and we do not recommend a taxi since they are very expensive. If you want the convenience of a taxi, you should book an airport pickup.

Gatwick Airport Website

London City Airport

By Underground

Take the Docklands Light Railway to Bank underground station. Here you can change to the Central Line, which goes quickly to West London. Unless your accommodation is near to a Central Line station, we suggest that you go to Shepherds Bush and take a taxi from there.

By Taxi

You can take a taxi from London City airport to West London.  Only take a licensed or London (black) cab.

London City Airport Website

Luton Airport

By Train

Thameslink operates a fast, frequent service direct between central London and Luton Airport Parkway train station. Luton Airport Parkway is around 35 minutes away from King’s Cross Thameslink station. When you land at London Luton Airport, catch the free Luton Airport Express shuttle bus from outside the terminal at Bay 1. This will take you to Luton Airport Parkway station in around 10 minutes where you can catch a Thameslink train southbound into London.

By Coach

Green Line 757 provides an express coach link between London Luton Airport and Central London. For information visit the Arriva Website.

By Taxi

Luton is further from London than Heathrow and we do not recommend a taxi since they are very expensive. If you want the convenience of a taxi, you should book an airport pickup.

Luton Airport Website

Stansted Airport

By Train

The airport railway station is situated below the terminal building. Train tickets can be purchased at the railway station. The Stansted Express is a fast and convenient way to and from Stansted Airport, with trains departing every 15 or 30 minutes, with an average journey time of approximately 45 minutes. They arrive at London Liverpool Street, and from there we suggest that you take the Central Line, which goes quickly to West London. Unless your accommodation is near to a Central Line station, we suggest that you go to Shepherd’s Bush station and take a taxi from there.  Only take a licensed or London (black) cab.

At the time of writing the last train to leave Stansted Airport for Liverpool Street leaves at 00.30 (Monday – Thursday and Saturday), 01.30 (Friday and Sunday).  Click here to check the most up to date timetable.  However, the Stansted Express takes approx. 45 minutes from Stansted Airport to Liverpool Street.  The last Central Line tube to leave Liverpool Street travelling west to Shepherd’s Bush is at 0022 (Monday – Saturday) or 2338 (Sundays), so make sure that you can connect to the tube in Liverpool Street.  Click here to check the first and last trains on all tube lines.  We recommend that you allow at least one hour between your train leaving Stansted Airport and the last tube so you have time to buy your tube ticket and get to the platform before the last train.

If your flight is due to arrive late in the day and you are concerned about a possible delay and the impact this would have on your journey into and across London click here to read about our airport transfers.

By Coach

The coach station is located below between Zone C and D of the Short Stay Car Park. Tickets can be purchased from the coach ticket desk in the arrivals area in the terminal (06:00 – 21:30) or in the coach station (24 hours a day, 7 days a week). Tickets may also be purchased on the coach. Services include:

  • A6 – London Victoria (Central London)
    Connects Stansted Airport with London Victoria – Central London via Golders Green, Finchley Road Underground Station, St Johns Wood, Baker Street, Marble Arch and Hyde Park Corner.
    Operates up to every 15 minutes – 24 hours a day.
    Further information: 0871 781 8181 (UK only) or visit the National Express Website.
  • A8 – London Liverpool Street and London Victoria (Central London)
    Operates to London Liverpool Street and Victoria every 20 minutes between 0000 and 0430 hours.
    Further information: 0871 781 8181 (UK only) or visit the National Express Website.
  • A9 – London Stratford
    A non-stop service to London Stratford every 30 minutes, 24 hours a day.
    Further information: 0871 781 8181 (UK only) or visit the National Express Website.

By Taxi

Stansted is further from London than Heathrow and we do not recommend a taxi since they are very expensive. If you want the convenience of a taxi, you should book an airport pickup. Click here to read about our airport transfers.

This information has come from

http://www.londonschool.com/information/coming-and-going/arriving-at-a-london-airport/

 

I hope that you find the conversation and the you   tube videos helpful. Bye for now.

GREETING PEOPLE AND INTRODUCING YOURSELF

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The following lesson comes from:

http://www.easypacelearning.com/all-lessons/learning-english-level-1/98-greetings-and-introductions-basic-english-lesson

It is basic and will show you how to introduce yourself.  It is very simple and if you follow the guideline you will not go wrong.

Greetings and introductions in English

Basic greeting and introductions and responses

This English lesson you will learn how to ask someone for there full name and what to ask  them if you don’t understand what they are saying.

Greeting and introducing yourself

Hello, my name is John, what is your name?

Hi John my name is Jane pleased to meet you.Greeting someone and asking them there name

Hello, I’m Peter what is your name?

Hello, my names Sarah nice to meet you.

Can you tell me your name please?

my name is John Smith, pleased to meet you.

What if I don’t understand them?

Teacher:-  Please tell me your name?

Student:-  my name is Boris Jones.

Teacher:- Am sorry I don’t understand, please repeat it slowly for me

Student:-  B – o – r –  i – s     J – o – n – e – s

**Hint if you still don’t understand what they are saying ask them to spell it **

Teacher:- Am sorry I still don’t  understand, please spell it for me

Student:-  B – o – r –  i – s     J – o – n – e – s

Teacher:- Thank you.

Greetings and responses

Learning about basic greetings and introductions English lesson

A conversation between two people

Can you tell me your full name please?  My full name is John Pilkington

I’m sorry , what was your last name again?  My last name is Pilkington.

 Am sorry I don’t understand. Could you please repeat it more slowly for me?  P – i – l – k – i – n – g – t – o – n.

How do you write that? Could you spell it please?  P – i – l – k – i – n – g – t – o – n.

And could you tell me your first name please?  John

Pardon? John – J-o-h-n.

Can you tell me your telephone number please?   8- 2-2-3-2-7-1-9.

Thank you John for your time. You’re welcome I hope to hear from you soon.

Remember these words

Thank you               Please               excuse me

The words in red are considered to be polite, if these words were not included depending on the tone of your voice you might come across as rude,it is best to be polite at all times.

he Online English dictionary – English lesson

Some you tube videos :

 

 

Now can you go home and practise an English conversation.  Good luck.

STILL ON THE SUBJECT OF SPEAKING ENGLISH

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The English language is very important and more so today than ever before.  As I said yesterday English is required for :

  1.   Education
  2. Travelling
  3. Career
  4. Hobbies e.g. watching Hollywood films.  For me, I prefer watching English films because I find sub titles very annoying as it detracts from me enjoying the film.  Also, the sub titles go so quickly that before I am half way reading them, they are gone.  That is just me.

Here is a link with questions which you can try and answer.  It is very useful for students doing ESL exams.

http://teflpedia.com/Learning_English_conversation_questions

  • What are your feelings about the English language?
  • What are your reasons for studying English?
  • Under what circumstances (if any) do you need to use English in real situations?
  • What are the major differences between English and your native language?
  • What are the similarities between English and your native language?
  • What do you think is the easiest thing about learning English?
  • What is the most difficult thing about learning English?
  • Why is it so easy for children to learn languages and so difficult for adults?
  • When did you start to learn English?
  • Do you think that it’s an advantage or a disadvantage if your teacher speaks your native language? Why?
  • What skills do you think an English teacher needs?
  • What do you think about the suggestion that all schoolchildren should learn English?
  • Which of the four language skills do you find most difficult in English: Listening, speaking, reading or writing?
  • Which of the four skills require you to produce language and which of the four skills require you to understand without producing?

Speaking

  • Some people get very embarrassed when they have to speak in a foreign language. Does this happen to you? What suggestions would you give to somebody who suffered from this problem?
  • Have you ever tried speaking English after having a couple of drinks? Was your ability to communicate better or worse?
  • What difference do you think that having an English-speaking boyfriend or girlfriend would make to learning the language?
  • Have you ever tried singing in English? Do you find it easier or harder than speaking?

Listening

  • Which of the following do you think would be the best system of practising English listening:
    • Watching a video in English without subtitles;
    • watching a video in English with English subtitles;
    • watching a video in English with subtitles in your own language;
    • watching a video in your own language with subtitles in English?
  • The BBC has a large selection of podcasts in English. Have you ever tried downloading and listening to any? What do you think of this method of practising English?
  • Which do you find it easier to understand: native English speakers or other foreigners? Why do you think this is?
  • Do you ever listen to English songs? Can you understand them? Do you think this helps with your English?

Reading

  • Do you ever have to read in English? What sort of things do you need to read?
  • Have you ever tried reading English books for pleasure? What did you read?
  • Much of the internet is in English. What English-language websites do you visit?
  • Do you read any English-language newspapers? Which ones?
  • What do you think about reading out loud in English?

Writing

  • Which do you think is most difficult: writing in English or speaking in English? Why?
  • What is your opinion of English spelling? How would you improve it?
  • What do you think is the most difficult thing about writing in English?
  • Have you ever tried having English speaking pen-pal?

Grammar

  • Do you think that English is complicated or simple? Why?
  • Which do you think is most important: thoroughly learning English grammar or trying to use the language in real situations?

See also

Here is a youtube video on Why learn English.

Here is another video.

 

Hope that was interesting and has encouraged you to learn English more fluently.  See you tomorrow.

 

Just chatting

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Today I am going to do something different.  I think you must have had your fill of verbs.  So now I would like to talk about the different occasions when you NEED to speak English or at least to understand English.  You can come to the blog and add more if you like.

  1.  You need to know English when you visit an English-speaking country.  You can try signalling with your hands, but that will only take you so far.
  2.  If you are doing the IELTS, TOEFL,TOEIC exams.
  3. If you are a pilot.  The language of communication is English.
  4. Many medical and IT books are in English.
  5. Nowadays, many companies require a working knowledge of English.  One of my students told me that their company is worldwide and all the managers must speak English fluently as it is the only form of communication.
  6. Sales personnel.  If you are trying to sell your products overseas it is essential that you are able to speak English to be able to convince people from other countries to buy your products.

Is this a good encouragement for learning English?  More and more young people and even middle aged people are learning English because of better job prospects.  Some are learning it to better themselves.  Some are just learning it for when they travel.  Some students like me to give them menus in English so when they travel they can order food in English.  How many people want to travel to US and UK?  Trust me, there are tons of people wanting to travel to these countries.  I am going to try and do something different every day so I am going to rack my brain today as to what I should do tomorrow.  I will continue with my grammar lessons but for the next few weeks I would like to do something different.  Hope that you enjoy this.  Have a lovely day today!!

 

PRESENT PERFECT

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It’s Monday.  How was your weekend.  Did you have a good time?

I am going to go into the Present Perfect which my students find very difficult.  However, before I do that I am going to post something which I got in my email about phrasal verbs which I did a few lessons ago.  You will find it useful.  It is from Off2Class.  Hope you find it useful and enjoyable.

With today’s five additions to Off2Class’ Phrasal Verb Category, you now have 37 lessons focusing exclusively on this heavily-used area of the English language:

PV4.20 – Multiword Verbs with KEEP

PV4.21 – Multiword Verbs With LET 

PV4.22 – Multiword Verbs With LOOK

PV4.23 – Multiword Verbs With MAKE

PV4.24 – Multiword Verbs With PAY

Although the tense is called Present Perfect it  actually refers to action in the past.  I am going to give you a link which I have always found very useful for my students.

http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/present-perfect-use.html

I copied and pasted the page which I wanted you to have a look at and lo and behold the graph came up as well.  I always find it useful to see the work on the page instead of clicking on the link or copying and pasting.  I guess I am very lazy.  I have done it all for you.

Using the Present Perfect

When should we use the present perfect tense?

 

This is one of the most difficult tenses to use correctly. I hope the rules below are helpful:

Present Perfect Infographic We use this tense for unfinished and finished actions:

Unfinished Actions
We use this tense when we want to talk about unfinished actions that started in the past and continue to the present. Usually we use it to say ‘how long’ an action or state has continued with ‘since’ and ‘for’. Often, we use stative verbs in this situation:

  • I‘ve known Karen since 1994.
  • She‘s lived in London for three years.
‘Since’ and ‘For’
We use ‘since’ with a fixed time in the past (2004, April 23rd, last year, two hours ago). The fixed time can be another action, indicated with the past simple (since I was at school, since I arrived):

  • I’ve known Sam since 1992.
  • I’ve liked chocolate since I was a child.
  • She’s been here since 2pm.

We use ‘for’ with a period of time (2 hours, three years, six months):

  • I’ve known Julie for ten years.
  • I’ve been hungry for hours.
  • She’s had a cold for a week.
Finished Actions
1: Life experience
(we don’t say when the experience happened, just sometime in the past)

  • I have been to Tokyo.
  • She has lived in Germany.
  • They have visited Paris three times.
  • We have never seen that film.
  • Have you ever read ‘War and Peace’?
2: A finished action with a result in the present (focus on result)

  • I‘ve lost my keys (so I can’t get into my house).
  • She‘s hurt her leg (so she can’t play tennis today).
  • They‘ve missed the bus (so they will be late).
  • I‘ve cooked dinner (so you should come and eat).
3: With an unfinished time word (this month, this week, today, in the last year)

  • I haven’t seen her this month.
  • She‘s drunk three cups of coffee today.
  • This week they‘ve been shopping four times.

Note: We can’t use the present perfect with a finished time word:

  • I’ve seen him yesterday.
‘Been’ and ‘Gone’
In this tense, we use both ‘been’ and ‘gone’ as the past participle of ‘go’, but in slightly different circumstances.
Been
We use ‘been’ (often when we talk about ‘life experience’) to mean that the person being talked about has visited the place, and come back. Notice the preposition ‘to’:

  • I’ve been to Paris (in my life, but now I’m in London, where I live).
  • She has been to school today (but now she’s back at home).
  • They have never been to California.
Gone
We use ‘gone’ (often when we are talking about an action with a result in the present) to mean that the person is at the place now:

  • ‘Where’s John?’ ‘He’s gone to the shops’ (he’s at the shops now).
  • Julie has gone to Mexico (now she’s in Mexico).
  • They’ve gone to Japan for three weeks (now they’re in Japan).

Did the above post make the Present Perfect easier for you.  Here are some You tube videos:

Well, I hope you go home and practise the formation and use of the Present Perfect.  See you tomorrow.

PAST CONTINUOUS

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Hi.  I had quite a bit of work to do this morning as I could not upload my picture.  I do not know about you but I love to see my picture.  Seeing the orange blossoms every morning uplifts my spirit.  Today I am going to continue with the past continuous.  Are you ready to learn another tense?  As usual I will use excerpts from my book.  Today is not my lucky day.  I had an inordinate amount of trouble trying to copy and paste from my book and so I have copied the following from :https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs/past-tense/

The past continuous which is also known as the past progressive is formed from the past tense of be with the -ing form of the verb:

We use the past continuous to talk about the past:

  • for something which continued before and after another action:

The children were doing their homework when I got home.

Compare:

I got home. The children did their homework.
and
The children did their homework when I got home.

As I was watching television the telephone rang.

This use of the past continuous is very common at the beginning of a story:

The other day I was waiting for a bus when …
Last week as I was driving to work …

  • for something that happened before and after a particular time:

It was eight o’clock. I was writing a letter.

Compare:

At eight o’clock I wrote some letters.

In July she was working in McDonald’s.

  • .to show that something continued for some time:

My head was aching.
Everyone was shouting.

  • for something that was happening again and again:

I was practising every day, three times a day.
They were meeting secretly after school.
They were always quarrelling.

  • with verbs which show change or growth:

The children were growing up quickly.
Her English was improving.
My hair was going grey.
The town was changing quickly.

Can you now tell the difference between the simple past tense and the past continuous tense?

I will now give you some you tube videos of the past continuous tense.

 

This is an excellent video.  It is very well explained.  I hope that you enjoy it.

Here is another one.

One last video.

Spend the weekend studying both tenses and practise when to use them.
Have a great weekend.  See you next week.